Posts Tagged ‘ new home sales management ’


New Home Sales Training (Mini Clip) | Forrest Performance Group

August 20, 2013

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New Home Sales Training (Mini Clip) | Forrest Performance Group

Check out New Home Sales Training with Jason Forrest.

2011 Leadership Summit – The Purpose of a Sales Leader | New Home Sales Management Training

August 19, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – The Purpose of a Sales Leader | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest uses parenting the example of his children to instill and encourage leadership.

2011 Leadership Summit – If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Join ‘Em | New Home Sales Management Training

August 19, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Join ‘Em | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest advocates the book ‘Influencer’ and the concept of brining people on your team and giving them a sense of power.

2011 Leadership Summit – Huddle Calls | New Home Sales Management Training

August 19, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – Huddle Calls | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest encourages the strength of teams with huddle calls.

2011 Leadership Summit – Grit or Grace? | New Home Sales Management Training

August 19, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – Grit or Grace? | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest advocates the purpose of a leader using accountability.

2011 Leadership Summit – Generic vs. Specific | New Home Sales Management Training

August 19, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – Generic vs. Specific | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest argues for the importances between generic and specific tactics and their relation to grit and grace.

2011 Leadership Summit – Flying By the Seat of Your Pants | New Home Sales Management Training

August 19, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – Flying By the Seat of Your Pants |New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest discusses managing sales by being proactive.

2011 Leadership Summit – Finding Leaders | New Home Sales Management Training

August 19, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – Finding Leaders | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest addresses the need for leaders.

2011 Leadership Summit – Competition and Value | New Home Sales Management Training

August 19, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – Competition and Value | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest discusses ah ha moments, heart-to-hearts, and the training tools for sales pros.

2011 Leadership Summit – Back on Track Plan | New Home Sales Management Training

August 16, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – Back on Track Plan | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest speaks about the Back on Track Plan at the 2011 Leadership Summit.

2011 Leadership Summit – Audio Recordings | New Home Sales Management

August 16, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – Audio Recordings | New Home Sales Management

Jason speaks about Audio Recordings at the 2011 Leadership Summit.

2011 Leadership Summit – 4 Questions to Ponder | New Home Sales Management Training

August 16, 2013

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2011 Leadership Summit – 4 Questions to Ponder | New Home Sales Management Training

Jason Forrest speaks about the 4 questions to ponder at the 2011 Leadership Summit.

New Home Sales Management Training Testimonial – Feedback from Miller & Smith

August 16, 2013

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New Home Sales Management Training Testimonial – Feedback from Miller & Smith

Miller & Smith give feedback on New Home Sales Management Training.

New Home Sales Management Training Testimonials- Feedback from Jennifer Olsen

August 16, 2013

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New Home Sales Management Training Testimonials- Feedback from Jennifer Olsen

Jennifer Olsen explains her experience with New Home Sales Management Training.

Forethought–more than a to-do list

August 20, 2012

Woman Thinking-Forethought-Jason Forrest-Forrest Performance GroupForethought: 1. Thoughtful provision beforehand; prudence. 2. Previous consideration; anticipation.

Giving something forethought is a great way to start just about anything–your week’s meals when you’re trying to lose weight; your 401K contributions when you’re planning for retirement; and even your interactions with customers.

There are a few levels of forethought–the first is your basic to-do list, covering what you plan to do in your day or week. The next addresses the goal behind the items on your to-do list. But there’s another level of forethought that I like to think of it as an Olympic level because it’s a long-term, highly-detailed plan for how you’re going to reach your goal.

1Olympic athletes do more than visualize a gold medal finish. They make and follow strict eating and training plans LONG before their events. It’s a physical and mental thing.

So you want to close that next new home sales or make six figures? What do you need to do today, tomorrow, next week, next month? And how are you going to do each of those things?

It’s the same for sales professionals–the more you plan ahead, the better prepared you’ll be, the more confident you’ll feel, and the more likely you are to accomplish your goals. Let’s say you have a follow-up appointment with Mr. and Mrs. Smith. Rather than playing it by ear, play the whole thing through before they even show up.

Maybe you realize that when your prospects came in the first time, you ended up focusing on Mr. Smith because he was the talker. So this time, you think about how to engage Mrs. Smith. You write out a list of the questions you plan to ask her, when you’ll ask them, how you anticipate she’ll respond, and what you’ll do from there. You plan which homes you’ll show the couple and how you’ll handle the obstacles and questions that may come up. You strategize which sites you’ll show them (based on what you learned about them on their first visit) and the questions you’ll ask at each point along the way. It can go on and on, but you get the idea.

Really spend some time with the prospects before they even arrive. That way, when they show up, you’re more than ready.

Comment below on ways you’ve used forethought to your advantage recently.

 

Contributed by Jason Forrest, new home sales trainer/coach

Jason Forrest (named one of 2012′s Top Young Trainers for Training Magazine–a national, industry-wide publication) is an expert at creating high-performance sales cultures through complete training programs. He incorporates experiential learning (rather than theory) to increase sales, implement cultural accountability, and transform builders into sales organizations that build homes. A sales professional at heart, Forrest is the author of Creating Urgency in a Non-Urgent Housing Market and 40-Day Sales Dare for New Home Sales. As a consultant for many of the leading homebuilders in the United States, Canada, and Australia, Forrest’s competitive distinction is his behavior-modification approach (which focuses on people, process, and presentation) and his focus on culture change.  Learn about our new home sales training programs at http://www.forrestperformancegroup.com.

On Coaching and Cookies–the X Factor Sales Coach

August 15, 2012

“All fighters are pig-headed some way or another: some part of them always thinks they know better than you about something. Truth is: even if they’re wrong, even if that one thing is going to be the ruin of them, if you can beat that last bit out of them… they ain’t fighters at all.” –Eddie, Million Dollar BabyCookie Jar-Security-Jason Forrest-Forrest Performance Group

Salespeople are fighters. Why else would they give up the security of knowing their income each paycheck, work retail hours, and miss weekends and holidays with their family and friends?

I’ve got a little three-year-old fighter on my hands in my son, whose circumstances (including my instructions) aren’t going to separate him from what he wants. Is it a challenge to parent him? Sure. But it’s rewarding, too. Of course he has to learn how to follow instructions and I have to teach him respect and temperance. It’s like you. As a home sales consultant, you need team members who will allow you to help them ditch the programming and beliefs that hold them back.

But you also gotta have people with a little spunk. Remember–this is sales! If your sales pros don’t have an edge, they ain’t gonna make it. So yes, salespeople tend to have a little bravado and think they know better. And that can be challenging. But they also tend to be like my son–purposeful and persevering toward reaching their goals.

So don’t be discouraged if you get a little push back. What you have is a fighter. And you can work with that.

Respect them, earn their respect, and sell them on the reasons they should want you to be their coach. I guarantee if you start proving that your coaching puts money in their pockets, they’ll be lining up at your door.

To hold yourself accountable, strive to make your coaching sessions worth the $600-an-hour going rate for such coaching right now. Wait for your people to give you permission to coach them. And once they give it–coach them. Hold them accountable to being their best.

Contributed by Jason Forrest, new home sales trainer/coach

Jason Forrest (named one of 2012′s Top Young Trainers for Training Magazine–a national, industry-wide publication) is an expert at creating high-performance sales cultures through complete training programs. He incorporates experiential learning (rather than theory) to increase sales, implement cultural accountability, and transform builders into sales organizations that build homes. A sales professional at heart, Forrest is the author of Creating Urgency in a Non-Urgent Housing Market and 40-Day Sales Dare for New Home Sales. As a consultant for many of the leading homebuilders in the United States, Canada, and Australia, Forrest’s competitive distinction is his behavior-modification approach (which focuses on people, process, and presentation) and his focus on culture change.  Learn about our new home sales training programs at http://www.forrestperformancegroup.com.

What’s your why?

April 19, 2012

I always find that those with purpose are the most driven, successful, and happy people. Purpose is the why behind what we do. j forrest group inspiration board jason forrest new home sales training and development new home sales training programWhy are you in sales? Why do you sacrifice weekends and evenings? What life goals do you have? (And I’m talking about the ones that go beyond what you’re going to do this weekend).

As we stay connected to our personal why, it helps us strive continually to be better. That’s why I love what one of the sales coaches I work with did with his team members. He had each sales professional create his/her own inspiration board–filled with images and words that remind them why they do what they do each day.

Not only does it help create trust and community among the team (this sales coach said there were a few tears as they each shared), it helps us stay centered on the things that matter to us–the very reasons we get out of bed and into our business suits each day.

Choose your base–cork board, poster board, an empty frame…a cookie sheet. It doesn’t matter–just as long as you fill it with your whys. You can even create it so that it can evolve and grow as you evolve and grow.

So what’s your why? Share in the comments below. Better yet–share what you learned from creating your own inspiration board!

Contributed by Jason Forrest

Jason Forrest (named one of 2012′s Top Young Trainers for Training Magazine–a national, industry-wide publication) is an expert at creating high-performance sales cultures through complete training programs. He incorporates experiential learning (rather than theory) to increase sales, implement cultural accountability, and transform builders into sales organizations that build homes. A sales professional at heart, Forrest is the author of Creating Urgency in a Non-Urgent Housing Market and 40-Day Sales Dare for New Home Sales. As a consultant for many of the leading homebuilders in the United States, Canada, and Australia, Forrest’s competitive distinction is his behavior-modification approach (which focuses on people, process, and presentation) and his focus on culture change.  Learn more at http://www.forrestperformancegroup.com.

Number One Rule of Coaching

March 30, 2012

Even though Jill, a sales coach, called me for advice on a “disaster,” I knew she’d just been handed a gift from the coaching Jason Forrest quote managers versus coaches creating urgency leadership coaching new home sales traininggods.

Jill described an interaction that ended with a top-producing sales pro leaving her office in tears. She said, “I know I didn’t handle this situation well and I need help. Have you ever dealt with anything like this before?” I had.

One of Jill’s top producers, Morgan, was offended that Jill hadn’t chosen her as a team captain. Jill practically scoffed, thinking the reasons she didn’t choose Morgan should be obvious. She rattled off her laundry list of frustrations (including Morgan’s chronic late and incomplete paperwork). She made a strong case. And Morgan walked out in tears–feeling defeated.

I saw an opportunity. Jill saw a disaster. What she didn’t see is that Morgan had just given her permission to be her coach–the most valuable thing a coach can have in a team member. So I advised Jill to call Morgan back, apologize for letting her emotions drive her response (leaders can never apologize too much), and work with Morgan on a plan to reach her goal.

She could say, “I didn’t know being a team captain was so important to you and I would be so proud to have you contribute in that way. Let’s talk about how to get you there and make a plan so that, as soon as you reach the following goals, we can make it happen.”

Can you see the difference? In contrast to the insecurity she left Jill’s office with the first time, Morgan now feels empowered and has the fire in her belly that comes with having a goal to work towards. And Jill has the best gift of all–permission from Morgan to be her coach.

Reflection questions:

1. Have you ever attacked a team member’s weaknesses without providing a plan or a goal to work toward?

Why do you think it’s important for a team member to want to receive coaching from you (rather than having to)?

 

The above excerpt is from Jason Forrest’s upcoming book on sales coaching. Stay tuned for more details.

Jason Forrest (named one of 2012′s Top Young Trainers for Training Magazine–a national, industry-wide publication) is an expert at creating high-performance sales cultures through complete training programs. He incorporates experiential learning (rather than theory) to increase sales, implement cultural accountability, and transform builders into sales organizations that build homes. A sales professional at heart, Forrest is the author of Creating Urgency in a Non-Urgent Housing Market and 40-Day Sales Dare for New Home Sales. As a consultant for many of the leading homebuilders in the United States, Canada, and Australia, Forrest’s competitive distinction is his behavior-modification approach (which focuses on people, process, and presentation) and his focus on culture change.  Learn more at http://www.forrestperformancegroup.com.

Note from Jason: Create Your Future

March 14, 2012

“The future is not something we enter, it’s something we create.” –Leonard Sweet

Sales pros:create your future new home sales training and development new home sales trainer new home sales process builder training creating urgency jason forrest j forrest group

Your career is what you make it. And you can either settle with what it is or you can make the most of it. Here’s a tip—ask your sales manager to be your sales coach.

If you’re not getting the kind of coaching you need in order to achieve your very best, tell your coach. You’re a salesperson—sell them on what you would like and how they can help you reach your own goals as well as the company’s. You can also ask them to shadow you during a sales presentation and give you honest feedback on what you could do differently.

Look, even if your coach isn’t as good of a salesperson as you are, they can still see your sales presentation more objectively than you can. They don’t have to be better than you. They just have to be able to give you a form of objective reality (something we often can’t see about ourselves). In a sense, they hold up a mirror so that you can see what they see.

You can also have your sales coach ask you questions that hold you accountable to the sales process. Questions like the following:

  1. Where did the sale stop?
  2. Who stopped it?
  3. Why did it stop?
  4. What are you going to do to move the sale forward?

Not only will this approach benefit your sales performance, it will also help your coach see you as someone who is determined to grow personally. And that’s the kind of person a coach wants on her team.

Here’s to creating your own future and earning what you’re worth!

Jason Forrest

Sales Coaches – Trim the Management Fat

January 11, 2012

By Jason ForrestMessy Closet-Details-Weight-Jason Forrest-Forrest Performance Group

At a training session this week, we talked about the sales coach’s equivalent of one of the most common New Year’s resolutions—losing weight. Excess weight holds us back and keeps us from achieving all we want to achieve.

For new home sales coach (managers), it comes in the form of focusing too much on clearing our inboxes, checking items off our to-do list, and tackling excessive paperwork that we neglect the tasks that will really change our bottom line. Such administrative details “taste” great because they are, as Stephen Covey says, “tension-relieving.” But, like fats and sweets, we need to be temperate about those details or they will actually weigh us down.

“Exercising” by focusing on revenue-producing activities requires discipline but turns our new home sales teams into lean, mean, sales-generating machines!

Lose weight:

Count your calories-log the amount of time you spend on different activities throughout your days. Categorize them into non-revenue producing (described above) and revenue-producing (such as coaching your sales pros and walking with them through the front end of the sale).

Determine the percentage of time you are spending on each. If you are not spending the majority of your time on revenue-producing activities, your “diet” is off balance. Decide who can do the non-revenue generating stuff and divvy up the load wherever possible.

Gain Muscle:

The best way to gain ground is to stop managing and start coaching.

Here’s to a fit and profitable 2012!

P.S. Learn about our new home sales training programs.

When Passion Trumps Logic

November 7, 2011

Tim Tebow plays like every down is his last, boohoos through press conferences after tough losses, and demands the best Tim Tebow X Factor Advantagefrom himself and his teammates. The former Gators quarterback and two-time Heisman trophy winner (who now plays for the Denver Broncos) is intense about everything he does. Even if you’re not a fan of Tebow or of football at all, watch the montage (click on the image) for the sheer joy of seeing someone “bring it” every day.

Approach every new home sales prospect like this guy approaches every play and you’re guaranteed to win some contracts. And the great thing about Tebow is that, even though he’s in the middle of a tough season with the Broncos, I’m convinced that he’ll be successful. When you approach life like he does, you can’t really help but succeed at something.

I was a dumb jock in high school and got a rejection letter in the mail from my top choice of schools—Texas Christian University (TCU). My dad told me that I could complain and wallow in my rejection or, if I wanted it bad enough, I could get off my butt and make them an offer they couldn’t refuse. So I got in my red pickup truck, drove to TCU, and handed my rejection letter to the admissions office.

I told them every reason why they’d made a mistake and should give me another chance. They admitted me under certain conditions, including putting me on academic probation.

Their logic told them they couldn’t admit me. My passion told them they had to. I graduated in three and a half years…with honors.

That’s the X Factor Advantage.

P.S. Learn about our new home sales training programs.

New home sales coaches are Sherpas

September 22, 2011

A great coach is really a Sherpa–a guide who knows the terrain and how to reach a hiker’s desired destination.Mountain Climber-Sherpa-Jason Forrest-Forrest Performance Group

Sherpas do not tell people what to do. They understand who their mountain climber is and where they want to go. But they give them choices. They say, “We’ve got two paths we can take here. If you take path one, we’ll have a lot of steep climbing and ice, but you’ll get there a lot faster. Path two is less technical, but it will take you twice as long.”

As a new home sales manager, seek to give your salespeople sufficient information for them to make an educated decision and then coach them based on that choice. Consider what I said last week about the categories training falls into.

Ask your new home sales professionals what they’d like to focus on for the week. Say, “Would you like to work on something you’ve never tried before (maybe something in category three which will be a little more difficult) or something you’ve done before but need to be more consistent at?”

I’m a control freak (most sales managers are) and I sometimes lack the patience to let salespeople chart their own course. But unlike a flight instructor, who gives do-or-die instruction, my job is to know the goal and offer information and options about how to reach it.

The idea is that either way, they reach their goal. We, as Sherpas, just lead them to it.

P.S. Learn about our new home sales training programs.

Never Give Up! by Jeanne Conger

September 20, 2011

He struck out over 1,300 times in his career, and yet Babe Ruth is considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. new home sales managementRuth is a great example of one of my favorite adages: “Never, never, never give up.” The man is one of the most recognized players in history even though he has not played since 1935 and died in 1948.

In the new home sales industry, this means that we cannot become victims to market shifts, low consumer confidence, foreclosures, stringent loan conditions or any other obstacles that the market throws our way. We may “strike out” with several weeks of poor sales, but we must never, never, never give up.

A tough market will reveal the character of a company and the culture of an organization.

New home sales managers: Do you accept excuses for “no traffic” or “no qualified buyers” as a market condition that can’t be overcome? The question is what are YOU and your team going to do about it?

New home salespeople:

Don’t wait on fate! Create traffic by calling all your old prospects. Never, never, never quit (at least not until you have at least three appointments for the week).

Gain control of your success, whether it takes 30 calls or 300.

Contributed by Jeanne Conger

P.S. Learn about our new home sales training programs.